The Face of Chicago
I love my city. It's an emotion I couldn't hide, not even at gunpoint. I was born, raised and educated in Chicago and even slipped into a good career right here. Then, duties and dreams lured me away. But duties get boring, and dreams. . . well, dreams have a way of fizzling or coming true regardless of where you are. So I came back to my sweet home and found that it feels even better than before. Chicago is truer to itself and on the verge of good things. The difference has got to be the people: the natives, transplants, immigrants and visitors. They give Chicago its savor and make up its face. It's a composite face, an amalgam, a fusion and, at times, a confusion of the people living and passing through here. We are Chicago. And here we are!
December 10th, 11:51am 42 notes
lareviewofbooks:

The classic noir novel The Postman Always Rings Twice has been republished by the Folio Society. Steve Erickson takes another look at the book in honor of the occasion:

With its artlessly perfect first sentence — “They threw me off the hay truck about noon” — James M. Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice drew a line in the sand as defiant as any in literature since The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Not unlike that novel, Postman forced an untamed populist voice onto more exalted cultural sensibilities; of course, nothing could be more American. Cain is a major figure of American fiction’s shadow pantheon, the one that includes not Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Steinbeck but Paul Bowles, William Burroughs, and Philip K. Dick, with Faulkner, Miller, and Pynchon wandering the demilitarized zone between. The most commercially successful of them, Cain was also the most spiritually bleak, finding his calling late and fast in the Depression’s depths after a fitful career as a journalist. The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934) was a sensation and scandal, at the other end of the bookshelf from The Grapes of Wrath (1939): Tom Joad may have been riding that hay truck too, but Frank Chambers is the one who got thrown off.

Click here to read the rest of “Nothing More American: On James M. Cain” at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

A new edition of a great novel.

lareviewofbooks:

The classic noir novel The Postman Always Rings Twice has been republished by the Folio Society. Steve Erickson takes another look at the book in honor of the occasion:

With its artlessly perfect first sentence — “They threw me off the hay truck about noon” — James M. Cain’s The Postman Always Rings Twice drew a line in the sand as defiant as any in literature since The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Not unlike that novel, Postman forced an untamed populist voice onto more exalted cultural sensibilities; of course, nothing could be more American. Cain is a major figure of American fiction’s shadow pantheon, the one that includes not Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Steinbeck but Paul Bowles, William Burroughs, and Philip K. Dick, with Faulkner, Miller, and Pynchon wandering the demilitarized zone between. The most commercially successful of them, Cain was also the most spiritually bleak, finding his calling late and fast in the Depression’s depths after a fitful career as a journalist. The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934) was a sensation and scandal, at the other end of the bookshelf from The Grapes of Wrath (1939): Tom Joad may have been riding that hay truck too, but Frank Chambers is the one who got thrown off.

Click here to read the rest of “Nothing More American: On James M. Cain” at the Los Angeles Review of Books.

A new edition of a great novel.

(Source: lareviewofbooks)

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    Something else to add to the list of books to read (have seen the excellent film, and this article just makes me want to...
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    A new edition of a great novel.
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